Canada 150 Links!

Canada 150 Links!

Even the trashcans are getting in on the Canada Day festivities!

Even the trashcans are getting in on the Canada Day festivities!

Canada 150 is upon us!

Many of us will be celebrating in some form or another, and we would like to take this opportunity to think about what Canada means, throughout history and today, and the much needed work to address the violent founding of the nation. While some of us enjoy the privileges of this place, we also have a duty to educate ourselves about living responsibly on Indigenous land—an imperative for both white settlers and settlers of colour. To that end, we’ve compiled a list of some links to read on Canada 150. Have a safe, fun, and thoughtful long weekend and much love and solidarity from Pyriscence!

  • It’s probably no surprise that our first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, was a white supremacist.
  • For an Indigenous response to Canada 100, watch Lament for Confederation Chief Dan George 1967.

  • Native Land is a good resource for mapping territories. It is a collaborative project and constantly being refined.

  • Clayton Thomas-Müller’s article on Gord Downie and Indigneous allyship argues for the importance of foregrounding Indigenous voices and outlines ways that white settlers such as Gord Downie can support reconciliation.

  • Beenash Jafri examines complicity vs. privilege in relation to settlers of colour and also includes some relevant links.

  • The Teepee on Parliament Hill: Nine people were arrested after a teepee was erected on Parliament Hill. The teepee was later allowed to remain on the Hill at a different location. Now we just need the government to listen to the fasting water protectors and do something about those boil water advisories!

  • Here’s a video on why Canada 150 is only the beginning for Indigenous Reoccupation.

  • Resisting 150 is a project out of the University of Alberta. Check out the page for some more great links.

  • Twitter is a great place to learn! Check out this list of 45 things Trudeau could do instead of renaming National Aboriginal Day from Zoe Todd.

  • Saskatoon developed an Indigenous communications guide to fulfil one of the calls for action issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

  • Check out this piece in Canadaland from Chelsea Vowel, whose book Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis & Inuit Issues in Canada is a must-read for anyone interested in learning about Canadian history.

  • If you're into podcasts, this episode of Unreserved examines how Indigenous artists and activists are using the hashtag #Resistance150 to draw attention to 150 Indigenous heroes.

  • Here’s a poster pack for those interested in countering the uncritical nationalism decorating our public spaces. If that’s not your thing, you can still take a look at Pam Palmater’s article arguing that Canada 150 is a celebration of Indigenous Genocide.

  • Alethea Arnaquq-Baril’s brilliant documentary Angry Inuk lays bare the inequality of colonial capitalism specifically in relation to the Inuit seal hunt.

  • The relationship between Indigenous people and the justice system requires much more attention than we can give here, but one place to start is just the bare statistics, keeping in mind that what is reported does not always accurately reflect the reality.

  • And in case you have anyone in your life who’s feeling a bit smug in relation to our southern neighbours on this Canada Day, please let them know that we have many of the same issues that they are facing. Check out Desmond Cole’s outstanding piece “The Skin I’m In from a couple years ago and Reakash Walters and Bashir Mohamed on police carding, published on the eve of Canada 150.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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